Shed – eye for detail.

Posted on : October 14, 2012

Sheds come in different types

The majority of sheds sold today in Australia are of the portal frame design and the components are what is called cold rollformed. But there are two other important types of shed construction that is becoming more popular, the structural steel frame and the stud frame sheds. This is a quick rundown on the three different types:

 

1. Cold rollformed portal frame shed.

This is the most common type of shed and is normally supplied pre-engineered and in a kit form. The main structure (called the portal frame) consists of rolled purlins, girts, batton, top hat and brackets. The cladding and flashings are common to all types.

 

Portal frame showing apex and knee brackets

Portal frame showing apex and knee brackets

As you can see the basic prinicple is that all the purlins (both rafters and colums) consist of cold rolled C section joined by fabricated brackets that bolt each assembly together. The roof and wall members are added once all the portal frames have been stood. This is a very efficient system that can be transported easily and assembled on site with minimal tools. 

 

2. Structural fabricated steel shed.

 Nearly the same engineering prinicple as number 1 – except all the colums and rafters are from hot rolled section such as H section, I beam, or C channels with welded cleats and joiners on all ends. All other components are normally the same. The advantage of this type of design is for larger spans especially used in large warehouse constructions and normally over 18 meter width.
Structural steel is a bolt together design with heavy structural steel

The structural steel is heavy to transport but does allow faster erection and extremely high strength joining system. All the other components are very similar.

 

3. Steel stud framed sheds.

 Now this is completely different to the above two. It is identical to the steel stud framing used in housing and results in a very strong overall construction. The walls and trusses are all prefabicated in sections and simply stood on site and then clad. The advantage of this system is the ease of which you finish the sheeting internally and is the reason it is gaining popularity. 

Steel stud frame shed

As you can see there are no colums protruding into the interior and all window and door penetrations are done at fabrication stage. While slightly more to transport – the erection time is greatly reduced and the finish (interior) allows much cheaper cladding solutions. It can be treated in the same way as a normal house frame. 

 

Not all sheds are the same, and to ensure you obtain one that suits your purpose contact Shedeye.

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Sheds & Guns!

Posted on : July 26, 2012

Shed has more history than the Museum!

The newly restored shed at DownsSteam Railway and Museum is for the use of volunteers to work on the LOCO 106 “Pride of Toowoomba” which hopefully will be finished in 2015 for the locos 100th birthday!

William Boden and Tom Redwood are two of many volunteers who have helped get the new restoration shed at DownsSteam Railway and Museum up and ready for the opening on Saturday. Photo Dave Noonan

The full article concerning the shed and train museum is in the Toowoomba Chronicle on 19th July 2012. From the article the shed had many uses prior to its current use – and the original shed was purchased for use as an aircraft hanger at Oakey in Queensland (not far from Toowoomba)! The shed is not that special – except it was made in America in 1942 and shipped to Australia for use in the war period. The history of the shed is amazing – it was fabricated by Bethlehem Steel in Pennsylvania in 1942 nearly 70 years ago and with a huge effort of a design drawn up by USQ School of Engineering students, the shed was able to be reconstructed after many years lying at the old Bridge St quarry!

Now for the history the steel of this shed shares:  Bethlehem Steel in Pennsylvania was America’s second largest company that started in 1857 and finally filed for bankruptcy in 2001 and all assets sold. During the 1940’s it employed some 300,000 workers with 180,000 alone in the steel ship building sector. Coincidence is that Bethlehem Steel produced this railway gun and also the shed in Toowoomba that houses a railway museum. This particular gun is now in a museum in Brazil:

“Bethlehem 177” railway gun on display at Museum Militar Conde de Linhares

Along with this spectacular piece – Bethlehem Steel in Pennsylvania was producing one naval vessel per day – which totalled 1,121 ships which was more than any other builder in the war period.

6″, 10″, 12″, and 14″ naval guns being assembled at a Bethlehem Steel facility

So this company that made the Toowoomba shed also produce huge numbers of naval and army guns at the same time, How did it manage to fit in such a small (by comparison) order for an aircraft hanger at Oakey in Queensland. Well it will be an interesting tour of the Downs Steam Railway and Museum not only looking at the 100 year old “Pride of Toowoomba” locomotive, but seeing the 70 year old steel fabricated at the same time as thousands of guns, ships and icons in America. One like this one – that Bethlehem Steel supplied most of the steel for the cable cars and tracks – always it comes back to TRAINS!

Steel for the “San Francisco Municipal Railway” system came from Bethlehem Steel!

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Giant Cattle Shed.

Posted on : June 15, 2012

New cattle sale yards at Scone to be covered!

These cattle yards are at Scone and Upper Hunter, the saleyards are already considered among the 10 best facilities in New South Wales and are currently receiving tender to construct roofing over the facilities. Here are the details for the tender:

Upper Hunter Shire Council Tender – Design and Construction of Roof Over Part Of The Scone & Upper Hunter Regional Saleyards (NSW)
Tenders are invited from appropriately qualified and experienced contractors for the following tender
Tender No 05i2011 – Design and Construction of roof over part of the Scone & Upper Hunter Regional Saleyards including water harvesting and lighting
Initial roof area of approximately 2376sqm with possible secondary stage of 3.158 being a total area of 5.535sqm
Tender documents for Tender No 05/2011 will be available in electronic format only Interested contractors can register their details at Council’s et endenng portal http i!wwwtenderlink co/upperhunter to download the tender documentation
Site inspection arrangements and any enquiries relating to the proposed contract should be directed to Council’s l1anager Technical Support Services
Coleen Pinkerton on 026540 1115 or
Email c pinkerton@upperhunter, nsw gov au
The closing date & time for tender submissions is 4pm Friday 29 June 2012 Tenders will not be accepted after this time
Daryl Dutton
General Manager
Closing Date 29-06-2012
Source The Sydney Morning Herald Tuesday May 22. 2012

The roof area for this giant shed is in two parts and covers nearly 5,500 plus square meters. Still small in comparison to some of the giant cattle yards around Australia. A very large one – the Carcoar Saleyards have some impressive statistics mentioned below: These facts come from their website CTLX Facilities.

  • The sheep pavilion roof is 224m long and 82m wide, and the cattle pavilion 144m long and 109m wide.
  • The roofs are clad with site manufactured Aramax sheet which was developed in Carcoar, and is manufactured by Brice Engineers. 
  • The cattle pavilion roof sheets are believed to be the longest single length sheets manufactured and erected anywhere in the world. 
  • The 15,600 square metre cattle pavilion roof was manufactured and erected in ten days.

The sheeting also looks like aluminium as Zinc Alum and Colorbond are not suitable for this type of animal enclosure. See the Intensive Animal Farming Technical Bulletin CTB-22. It was manufactured by Brice Engineering and is marketed under the name of Aramax – they are now owned by Fielders Steel and their website is Fielders Aramax. Here’s a snap of the sales yard at Carcoar:

Carcoar Sales Yards - Aramax Roofing

Shed building on a giant scale – it’s good to see the commercial and industrial side of metal sheds still travelling in the right direction.

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Shed Cyclonic Regulations

Posted on : January 31, 2012

Shedeye Investigator – The Australian Story

Introduction

This discussion is broken into two points regarding LHL testing. The first is with a rollforming perspective, and the second from a shed manufacturing perspective.

The main aim is to generate discussion to educate and learn from the current regulations concerning LHL Standard Cyclic Test Method for Cyclonic Areas. It was officially phased in on the 30th April 2009 to meet the Building Code of Australia Specification B1.2.

Interpretation of Low-High-Low Cyclic (LHL) Testing

 Basically it is simulated wind conditions (cyclonic) method using low, the high, then low pressure sequence to test the wind loads on metal roof cladding in cyclonic conditions. This LHL test is considered better to represent typical cyclic regime on metal roof assemblies than the DABM test method that was in the Northern Territory and the Australian Standard AS4040.3:1999 test method previously used in Queensland and Western Australia. The test involves includes the roof assembly including the roof sheets, fasteners and the battens and their support fasteners.

From April 2009 all cladding and batten manufacturers need to demonstrate that their metal roofing assemblies specified for cyclonic areas of Australia have been tested using the LHL test method. More details are available in Technical Alert No 08/1 at www.eng.jcu.edu.au/cts .

Rollforming Manufacturer Perspective

So to understand the basic test of the roof assembly – each manufacturer must get their roof sheeting (all profiles specified for cyclonic regions) tested under LHL. There are numerous testing stations in Australia and the one chosen here for example only is the James Cook University Cyclone Testing Station. Also in this discussion the roof cladding type is corrugated – produced by all of the rollforming companies in Australia and also used in cyclonic regions in Australia. The LHL stipulates that for a company to sell corrugated roof sheets in cyclonic areas – it must undergo LHL cyclic testing. The BRAND corrugated roofing is sold by some of the big multinational rollformers throughout Australia. The Company here is Company ZZZ, and to comply it sends it corrugated roof sheeting to the cyclone testing centre to meet compliance to the LHL test. This sample is rollformed on one machine that converts the coil (flat sheet) to corrugated roof sheets. This is assembled with battens and fasteners then tested under LHL. Once the LHL tests have successfully completed Company ZZZ can then supply corrugated roof sheeting to all cyclone areas in Australia. Company ZZZ has numerous corrugated rollformers as well as the one that supplied the sheets for LHL testing and yet all the corrugated roof sheets are compliant to LHL.

By stipulating that the company brand of corrugated has to be LHL tested, they are accepting that all the corrugated rollformers held by that company are identical. For another company to provide corrugated roof sheets to cyclonic areas – they too have to complete LHL testing. This assumes that the profile and rollform machines are different from company to company. Those in the rollform industry know that this is not the case, and apart from some minor variations between machines it is the profile of corrugated (along with the feed coil properties) that determine the strength and its ability to undergo LHL test compliance. Yet Company XXX has to undergo LHL testing even though all its machines are identical to Company ZZZ machines. This is the only industry where identical products are testing not the manufacturing process.  The LHL testing should in fact be the responsibility of the rollform machine provider – and most of these (especially Australian and New Zealand machines) would all supply compliant corrugated roofing sheets. There should be compliance for these rollform machines to be registered to conform to LHL testing. Yet Company ZZZ who has gained LHL compliance for its rollform machines can buy a new corrugated rollformer from China that may not meet the standards previously obtained from its original sample material. It is the machine that makes the corrugated roof sheet and so testing of one machine from a multinational company will allow inferior product by the company utilising untested machines.

Shed Manufacturers Perspective

From a roll former’s point of view, if it can be demonstrated that structural roll formed products with the same girth and BMT thickness such as roof sheeting and top span that is identical in profile, and manufactured from the same coils of origin that have undergone the LHL testing criteria, what is the real purpose of having the product tested while there remains a question regarding the safety of the total structure? For example, the manufacturer of roll forming materials may argue that while the LHL testing applies only to the roof cladding and “immediate members” that support the roof cladding, failure to include the importance of the connections at the apex, knee, and tie downs, begs the question; how does the manufactured product miraculously become only when the supplier has had the immediate members tested in a wind tunnel that simulates cyclonic conditions?

It is in the real world where actual wind tunnels exist, moreover, regardless of whether the product has been endorsed by shedsafe, structures will continue to fail even before completion.  So concerned are the self appointed gatekeepers to the shed industry, they have aligned themselves with the BSA and other bodies in conducting seminars across the country, advising erectors how to construct sheds so as to avoid the structure  collapsing during construction.  Shed erectors are playing roulette at the hands of shedsafe’s smoking mirrors illusion, hence, the shed erector will be potentially at fault if it can be shown there was a failure on the erector’s part in failing to use his skills in making sure that the whole shed was acting as a diaphragm in order to hold it together in the event of a storm or freak wind that often collapses the frame during construction. In other words, wherever there is an accident on site during construction resulting in person(s) injured or killed, the shed erector, rather than those who endorsed the shedsafe product, will be liable.

Now for a comedic look at the situation.

 A recent inspection of a 3x3m garden shed is an example of the hypocrisy within the industry.

A Building inspector was recently surprised to notice that a garden shed structure was actually made from a .75 mm stud frame with 12mm tie downs at each stud, along with two extra 12mm tie down’s at each corner. He was further surprised to notice bracing on each wall and three 64mm top spans on the roof fastened with 12x 14×20 tek screws with 0.42BMT cladding properly secured to the top span, yet while he was surprised at the extent of the structure, given that most 3x3m garden sheds don’t have a frame at all, he nevertheless failed the inspection because the shed manufacturer had not stated on the plan that the cladding had a reference to the LHL testing.

When the customer advised the supplier, who in turn asked the building inspector to explain the problem, the building inspector advised the supplier to read the literature provided by the ASI’s shedsafe endorsement.  Interestingly, the booklet showed a reference to the LHL endorsement, but no reference to the safety of the entire structure.

Getting back to the manufacturer’s point of view, there is clear evidence that the only guarantee and endorsement of ShedSafe may offer is the customer will have no idea of the origin of the actual material used to manufacture the product or if the product has been tested.

Therefore if the structure is endorsed by an incompetent engineer who has compromised his or her ethical standards, nevertheless signs a FORM 15, there will be no recourse unless the company that has hired the engineer replaces the product. The replacement is usually conditional that the incident be kept confidential.

Besides this, as already pointed out, if one single LHL endorsement can be used as a blanket cover for an entire corporation regardless of the corporation’s many separate roll forming outlets with differing profiles, or whether the origin of the coil is Australian or Imported, how does the building inspector know the difference without authentic documentation? Does the material in question have a specific test certificate stating the origin of the material along with an endorsement from the testing facility given that what he is inspecting explicitly refers to the cladding and top span required on the approved plan, or does he really care about the weightier issues that he may be forced to confront?

Summary

The main reason of this viewpoint by two very different members of the shed industry supply chain is to generate discussion that will enable shed purchasers to be confident that all the factors & PROMISES made by the industry groups are capable of being produced in the supply & erection of their shed.

 To finalise, there is an instance of a well known shed supplier who sold (supply) only to a customer that collapsed during construction. This occurrence was exploited by others in the shed industry to their advantage by giving this as an example of a non-compliant shed industry member. Very far from the truth, the particular shed supplier warned the shed erector constantly regarding construction techniques – all advice was ignored. Subsequent investigations resulted in the shed manufacturer being involved – but of all the parties involved – the shed manufacturer supplied and erected the shed for no charge. This is the type of example of pride in this industry we need. The investigating bodies had no idea of what had occurred – only guesses.

Many thanks to the contributions of the rollformer and the shed manufacturer for this valuable insight into only two areas of the industry. Hopefully more to come from these two gurus of the industry!

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New shed at Wacol raises questions!

Posted on : January 25, 2012

Queensland steel industry feels the heat from cheap Chinese suppliers

This the heading from the Brisbane Times Article on January 23rd 2012. Basically a local Queensland company has won the contract to build the new Hitachi Headquarters at Wacol. The uproar is about the source of the steel, of which Southern Queensland Steel (next door to new building) failed to win the contract to supply the builder Spaceframe with the steel!

Here’s a picture of the new site for Hitachi and the Spaceframe building sign out the front.

 

Hitachi Machinery New Wacol Headquarters Site

 

 Here’s what Mr. Ian Cairns of the ASI stated in the article:

The Australian company that lost the contract, Southern Queensland Steel, confirmed the situation but directed questions to the Australian Steel Institute, of which it is a member.

The Australian Steel Institute blames Chinese government subsidies and the undervalued yuan for creating an unfair advantage for Chinese suppliers over local companies and increasing pressure on an industry that employs about 100,000 people nationwide. 

So what is the answer to this? Here are some of the questions raised by this deal between an Australian builder and the chinese steel supplier:

  1. Spaceframe is a Queensland company with many projects under its belt, both here in Australia and in Asia and the Pacific. It also has offices in China (see their website above) and is a very progressive company (family owned & run). Why is that Spaceframe can obtain prices from China for pre cut steel and yet the giants of the Australian Steel Suppliers are unable to do this?
  2. Southern Queensland Steel has both local and imported products – if builders want quotes on large quantities of precut steel – then they should be able to offer the same imported Chinese steel supply! BlueScope imports steel, One Steel imports steel, Orrcon imports steel along with just about all major steel manufacturers.
  3. Why is the ASI (a part of BlueScope) suddenly blaming the Chinese government for all this. Surely among some of the ASI’s vast membership – one would think the buying power from China would be greater than that of Spaceframe?

Ian cairns of the ASI went on regarding subsidies and the value of the Yuan versus the dollar!

‘‘We’ve got an undervalued currency from a major competitor, and of course we have a resources boom that is fuelling our currency as well, to the detriment of manufacturers,’’ he said.

‘‘So we’ve got a double whammy, where you could almost argue that the dollar is overpriced by 30 per cent and the yuan is underpriced by 30 per cent.’’

‘‘So before we even start [competing] we are 60 per cent off the mark.’’

But Ian, surely your members would be better off taking advantage of this to supply steel rather than pay more for Australian steel and not sell it? The members of the ASI could definately buy at a better rate from China than Spaceframe.

Also the engineering and design for many of these projects are now being sourced from overseas and having multiply specifications that allow steel to be supplied globally. When local builders can source direct from China and it’s hugh number of suppliers, why can’t the steel suppliers also do this. Much of the material used in manufacture of the local domestic shed industry is imported. Maybe the steel suppliers of Australia will have to open up offices in China to combat these cheaper prices.

 

 

 

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ShedSafe – An Industry Body or A Brand – Part 3?

Posted on : November 5, 2011

Shedsafe – A Question Mark?

Just answer one question please ?

What is the Base Metal Thickness required by ASI?

This is Part 3 and only a question? Within Shedsafe terms and conditions to join the group (brand) – the above item J. is applicable.

So – Shedsafe only allows BMT or TCT approved by the ASI – THE QUESTION IS what is the answer please. How thick is the BMT in all your shed members 0.35BMT or 0.42BMT or what? The ASI has now got to answer the question.

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Strange Shed – Balancing Barn?

Posted on : September 9, 2011

The shed/barn house is 100 feet long and only 50 feet of the base is on solid ground? There’s even a window in the floor to look down to the grassy area below.

Balancing Barn - Would you feel safe?

This is a holiday home that you can rent that is a few miles inland from the Suffolk Coast in the UK.  Some renters of the property worry if too many people go to the end it will tip! Maybe only a few too many meat pies for lunch could tip the scales of balance. You can rent this  “The Balancing Barn” (www.living-architecture.co.uk) that sleeps up to eight people and costs from £638 for a four-night midweek stay. The house was designed, built and owned by the not for profit group Living Architecture – whose co-founder designed this, Mr. Alain de Botton. Very different Alain.

Heres another view of the amazing Balancing Barn:

Strange Shed? For Rent

 They say as soon as you enter and walk across the threshold of the balancing point – you feel strangely in danger of it tipping! The floor window above the swing would also add to this.

Don’t think our portal frame sheds could delve into this magnitude of architecture?
 

 

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ShedSafe

Posted on : August 31, 2011

Does ShedSafe guarantee that your shed is in fact safe?

No. If your shed complies to The Building Code of Australia then your chances are far higher.

Does ShedSafe publish or contribute to the Building Code of Australia?

No. It copies large slabs of it in the “Design Guide Portal Frame steel sheds and garages”.

Does ShedSafe own or contribute to the AS/NZS 1170.2 2011 (Structural Design Actions : Wind Actions)?

No it was prepared by Joint Technical Committee BD-006 and was approved on behalf of the Council of Standards Australia on 23 November 2010 (published on 30 March 2011).

Who owns ShedSafe?

Shedsafe is owned by the ASI (Australian Steel Institute). The ASI was started using some large grants from Bluescope and Stramit.

Has ShedSafe ever rejected an applicant?

There have been no documented or rumoured rejections. Not bad for an accreditation that has to be earned and can’t be purchased.

Is ShedSafe Independent?

No.

How is Shedsafe funded?

Shedsafe is a commercial operation, that is used to fund the wages of the operators. ShedSafe charges the shed suppliers (those that have the software and organise the materials) to have engineers review three of their shed designs. Now of course these three designs are not their typical shed, they are over engineered and would be under the meticulous watchful eye of the shed suppliers engineers. This does have the potential to pick up glaring errors, but as far as being representative of the typical shed supplied, there is no way!
To further increase the money revenue potential, ShedSafe charges around the $500.00 mark to each of the shed sellers or distributors. How does this shed seller accreditation get earned? Sit a simple test, a pop quiz on the AS/NZS 1170.2. Again ShedSafe is earned not purchased. Rubbish!

Is ShedSafe a Brand or an Accreditation Scheme?

It is clearly a Brand. Accreditation is a quality assurance system of all processes that ensure the end product is safe and sound – the Shedsafe system of accreditation does not achieve this.

What do Shed Suppliers and Sellers think of Shedsafe?

They think it is a necessity as if your competitor has it then you will loose sales as the consumer is being mislead.

What do Shed Buyers think of ShedSafe?

They think it is a regulatory body equivalent to the BCA or Australian Standards. Wrong, wrong, wrong!!!!

Is Shedsafe going to protect consumers?

In its current state there is no way consumers will be protected.

Does Shedsafe ensure a 15 year product roof warranty?

No – not even its benefactor does a warranty on 0.35BMT roofing, which is being supplied by some Shedsafe accredited members.

Are Shedsafe accredited suppliers allowed to use 0.35BMT on their roofs?

This is the key to this whole business, some do and some don’t! Shedsafe does not provide even basic consistency in shed supply.

 

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10 Things You Must Know Before Buying A Shed or Garage!

Posted on : September 7, 2010

Download The Complete Article…


1. What Is The Height Of The Vehicle That You Are Going To Put Into The Shed or Garage?

The rule of thumb is that you will lose about 500 millimetres of clearance on the advertised Roller door height.  You can get a bit more height if you choose a gable entry over a side wall.

This is a very important consideration, as the height of your shed and the size of the roller door are contingent on the height of your vehicle.  There’s no point in buying a shed or garage only to find out that your boat or 4WD won’t fit in there because the shed roof is too low.  It’s vital that you take the proper measurements before you even go looking for a shed or garage.

Make sure you confirm your measurements and the amount of clearance your shed or garage will have with your local distributor.

2.  How To Get Finance For Your New Shed?

Before you consider finance through the shed or finance company, do your sums first, if you pay for the shed in cash; you can often negotiate a much better deal.

If you don’t have enough cash to pay for the shed outright, what can you do?

It may be cheaper overall to either get a personal loan or use the equity from your home so you can pay for the shed in cash and get a cheaper price than going through a finance company as you may have to pay establishment fees on top of the price of the shed.

Some shed finance companies can provide finance for the building and concrete as well, but it will depend on your financial circumstances – how much your income and assets are and how much debt you have.

Some shed companies provide consumers with interest free finance.  You can pay fortnightly or monthly through direct debit or credit card payments.  Once you receive delivery of the shed, your payment plan will commence.  But again, somebody is paying for the finance, usually through a more expensive purchase price, there is no such thing as a free shed after all!

3.  Are You In A Snow Loading Area?

If your property has an altitude of over 600 metres above sea level, it’s a legal requirement in Australia that your shed has a snow loading allowance built into the structural design.

It’s vital that you find out if you’re in a snow loading area as you need your shed to be strong enough to stand up to the weather conditions in your area, including ice and snow.  When looking at sheds, you can ask the distributor if their sheds have been calculated for snow loading.

Snow loading will also affect the required pitch of your roof, this means that you are going to need a pitch of at least 10 degrees upwards, depending on where you are located.

Remember, it’s important to consult with your local council first for snow loading requirements based on the Australian Standard 1170.3.


4.  Are You In A Wind Prone Area?

Simply ask your local council and your local shed distributor, it is too complicated to work out.

It is too hard to work out on your own as is based on the probable maximum wind speed in your region, if your site is on a hill or escarpment, if your site is located in suburbia or rural and the size and importance of the shed.

If you are in a wind prone area, the shed design needs to be stronger with more steel and will cost more.  This expense is a must otherwise your shed will blow down and will be a risk to yourself and others.

You will also have to check with the shed company to make sure the shed is strong enough to tolerate your area’s wind rating.  Your local shed distributor should know if you live in a wind prone area and what wind rating your shed needs to have.

As always, it’s essential that you check with your local council first before buying and installing your shed.  For a comprehensive analysis of the wind ratings take a look at the Steel Shed Groups publication Wind Actions on Steel Sheds and Garages (http://www.steel.org.au/_uploads/429_Wind_Actions_Steel_Sheds_2009.pdf)


5.  Are You Going To Build Your Shed Yourself?

You can save yourself a fortune building your own shed, however the bigger the shed the harder it is to erect.  Approximately 50% of all Sheds built in suburbia are owner built.

Are you going to build the shed yourself or are you going to hire concreters, shed erectors and plumbers?  You can save money by erecting the shed yourself, but if you’re not a handy person or don’t have any friends who are, you may be better off hiring experts who can install it for you and save you a big headache, as well as a lot of time.

The shed company you buy the shed or garage from may be able to provide you with their own contractors for erecting the shed, or give you the names of contractors.

The terms vary according to local councils (you MUST check them) however if the building is under $5,000 then you may be able to build without an owner-builder permit, depending on your local council.

If the building structure is over $12,000 then you need to apply for a Certificate of Consent.  This allows you to get a building permit and undertake your own building work as an owner-builder.

But it’s important you check with your local council first.  Some councils will require you to apply for a building permit (different to an owner-builder permit) in order to erect a shed.  If the structure is larger than 10 square metres in area, then the law requires you to get a building permit.

Theoretically you can never do plumbing work yourself as it‘s illegal; it needs to be conducted by a licensed plumber.


6.  Make Sure You Get Council Approval For Your Structure!

The variation between councils is great however there are a handful of situations where you do not need council approval and there are some limitations you need to be aware of.

  • Some councils do not require approval if the shed is smaller than 3 meters in width and 3 meters in height.
  • Some councils will allow the shed to be on the boundary while other councils will demand the shed to be situated at least 2 metres away with walkways .
  • Some councils will not allow certain shed colours due to the restrictions on the reflection of light and location aesthetics.
  • Some councils will not allow a shed if there is less than a certain percentage of land available on the block.

Just remember to check everything with your local council first!

This is generally what happens when you buy a shed or garage:

1)      You choose the kind of shed you want.

2)      You find a shed distributor you’re happy with.

3)      You decide how you’re going to finance the shed.

4)      You receive an engineering report from the shed distributor.

5)      You submit the engineering report to your local council, as well as an application for permission to build the shed.

6)      You receive advice from council whether your application is approved or not.

7)      If your application is approved, you can go ahead with your shed or garage.


7. When Do You Want The Shed Or Garage?

For custom built sheds, don’t count on parking the car in you new shed for 4-6 weeks from the time you make your decision to buy.

1)      It takes 3-5 weeks delivery time for the kit shed.

2)      It takes a day to pour the slab  (if you are getting a slab and not just footings)

3)      It takes a couple of days for the slab to dry completely (depending on the size) before you erect the shed or garage.

4)      Add two days for professionals to erect the shed or garage depending on size (for a standard size shed).

All of the calculations are assuming experience professionals, for somebody who is not then it can take much, much longer!!

8.  What Type Of Look Do You Want In Your Shed or Garage?

For custom built sheds there are over 500,000 different colour combinations using the standard Colorbound(TM) colours.  Combine the different materials and components and you have millions of unique configurations.

The number one biggest problem with new shed purchases is the colour selection, either incorrectly ordered, or incorrectly researched.  Choose wisely and triple check you are getting what you want as you’ll have to live with the colour once the shed arrives

The cladding you choose can be a standard corrugated (curved) surface, a square look or a combination of the both.

9.  Do You Want A Steel, Wood or Plastic Shed or Garage?

Steel sheds are the most versatile and affordable product in the market place.

Plastic sheds are usually only suitable for smaller sheds.  Wood sheds and garages are usually twice as expensive (installed) than the steel shed or garage equivalent.  You do have more variation in the styles by using wood, however given Australia’s termite problems, steel is a great option.

10.  Remember That Shedeye Can Help You Design Your Shed

Save up to 2 hours in shed and garage research, and filling out quotes by using the innovative web tool, www.shedeye.com.au.  100% free, always.

Shedeye was designed to allow you to visualise your shed, making it as close as possible to reality.  It also saves you hours by taking out the hassle of trawling through numerous shed sites, individually replicating the details of the shed your required.  A great online resource for designing, getting quotes and comparing sheds and garages.

www.shedeye.com.au

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3 of 10 – Things You Must Know Before Buying A Shed or Garage!

Posted on : August 22, 2010

Are You In A Snow Loading Area?

If your property has an altitude of over 600 metres above sea level, it’s a legal requirement in Australia that your shed has a snow loading allowance built into the structural design.

It’s vital that you find out if you’re in a snow loading area as you need your shed to be strong enough to stand up to the weather conditions in your area, including ice and snow.  When looking at sheds, you can ask the distributor if their sheds have been calculated for snow loading.

Snow loading will also affect the required pitch of your roof, this means that you are going to need a pitch of at least 10 degrees upwards, depending on where you are located.

Remember, it’s important to consult with your local council first for snow loading requirements based on the Australian Standard 1170.3.

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