ShedSafe – An Industry Body or A Brand – Part 2?

Posted on : September 28, 2011

Shedsafe errors in the requirements of its members?

This Part 2 (of many to come) is basically regarding the accreditation requirements placed on its manufacturers of sheds that are Shedsafe Accredited. The first requirement that is outlined below is in regard to the thickness of the steel roofing utilised in shed construction. Prior to delving into this area – a brief explanation of the product flow is required of the steel used in the shed roof cladding .

The steel manufacturers process iron ore in a furnace to produce steel – very basic and this is then transformed into the many steel products available on the market. The roof sheet steel is in a coil approximately 940mm wide with a BMT (Base Metal Thickness) of 0.42mm which can have a Coloured paint coating or Zinc Aluminium Alloy. This coil is sold to the metal rollformers to run through a rollforming machine to get the required profile of roofing. These companies also rollform the purlins, battens, tophat, gutters, ridge cap, fascia, barge mould, gable roll and fold most of the required metal flashings. These are all rolled from an order from the shed manufacturer according to the shed being supplied. In some cases the shed reseller may be part of a large group and simply order direct from the parent rollformer.

So the rolled coloured corrugated roofing arrives on site (and all other parts) as a direct result from the customer shed order that has been designed, approved, manufactured, delivered and ready for erection. Your shed is also issued with a 15 year roofing, cladding and purlin warranty from the steel manufacturer also sometimes the parent company of the shed reseller.

Lets start with the quote to the customer from the shed reseller. You’ve given all the details of your requirements of a shed and accepted the quote. Here is a small sample of one such Shedsafe Accredited reseller that is also owned by a national Shedsafe Accredited Shed manufacturer.

 

Details of Roof Sheet Thickness

 

Notice the roof cladding is 0.40 TCT Trimdek Profile C/B. The Trimdek and Colorbond description is fine, the 0.40 TCT is the roof sheet properties – that is in this case a 0.40mm thick Total Coated Thickness or back to the earlier description is equivalent of 0.35mm BMT (Base Metal Thickness). So this is 0.07mm thinner than the normal roof sheeting that should be installed on a domestic sheds. Why do they supply this sheeting for roof materials on sheds? Because it’s cheaper and many people don’t know the difference! So Shedsafe accredited resellers and manufacturers have been through the extensive training and requirements of the ASI run Shedsafe group. In fact in one of their requirements of shed manufacturers to become accredited is the fact outlined above regarding product warranty for 15 years. Here is the item by Shedsafe that requires manufacturers and resellers to:

 

15 Year Roofing Warranty

 

So the Shed Industry Benchmark group of Shedsafe – is setting the target or requirement of a 15 year warranty and its strick accreditation process is followed by all of its members. So the sample above (a shed which was supplied in 0.35BMT roofing) will have a 15 year warranty? WRONG.

Now lets look at Shedsafe again, an industry body run by the ASI of which BlueScope is the major sponsor. BlueScope also manufacturers the steel coloured coil for these very same Shedsafe accredited manufacturers and resellers. So lets examine the warranty for 0.35BMT roofing use in sheds.

 

 

BlueScope Roofing & Cladding Warranty

 

The main part in this warranty is that the supplier of the steel will not give a warranty on the 0.35BMT roofing that can be found in part 1 of the terms and conditions of the BlueScope Shed & Garage Warranty.  The basic error is that the BlueScope run ASI and its ShedSafe group have not covered all the small detail and continues to stipulate that Shedsafe accreditation is the Industry Benchmark. If they cannot enforce a simple base metal thickness that the manufacturer stipulates – what else is also wrong?

If your shed is supplied with 0.35BMT (or 0.40TCT) roofing – then it is not covered by the BlueScope warranty and the shed reseller will have to provide an independent cover for this warranty. Will they provide a 15 Year warranty on a 0.35 BMT thick roof sheet?
Accreditation is a simple word that enforces the meaning of having all the checks and processes in place to eliminate error.
This is one error that Shedsafe has to correct.
Next week part 3 – more detail of the marketing group Shedsafe!
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Steel shed price Rise

Posted on : September 19, 2011

Steel Price Rise Due in next 3 to 7 Weeks

BlueScope Distribution has notified customers of an impending two tier price rise in the coming weeks. It involves a base steel rise of between $60 to $120 per tonne on most product groups. As well they will be implementing specific surcharges to recoup key costs. These surcharges will be provided shortly.

 

Steel Shed Prices will rise with Australian Steel?

 

This comes after a significant bonus of over $3 million was paid to Key BlueScope Management (11 people) as a reward for leadership – not profit incentive? The notification states that volitilty in steel prices, rising labour costs, rising freight costs, rising processing costs, rising warehouse costs, and a rise in general utilities are the reasons. Along with the iron ore and coal price increase that has caused the steel price rise – the others will be included in the additional surcharges.

They state they have begun to receive notice from their steel suppliers (BlueScope Steel) of pending price increases. This does not look good for further sales of BlueScope Steel in the shed industry. With imports on the rise at cheaper prices currently – this price rise will further erode steel sales by BlueScope.

It will also follow by a notification by One Steel on its price increase – so many of the big shed manufacturers will be importing direct to keep competitive in the shed industry. Many of the big reseller shed companies will want to lock in prices for as long as possible to avoid this increase. Negotiations are already occurring between some of the big rollformers and BlueScope, along with talks between rollformers and shed companies.

 

Have you been told of this price rise?

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Reflecting on Reflectivity

Posted on : April 6, 2011

Shedeye has questioned the ambiguity of the SEPP definition of “low reflectivity” and is going to expand more on this.  This article will explain the standards and map them to each other.  For a complete discussion go to the Shedeye Investigator  article.

The current requirements of reflectivity standards of metal cladding as seen in BASIX, BCA and SEPP all seem too ambiguous for correct applications and on site judgement and analysis. As explained below, the variations of each of these regulatory bodies will be apparent especially in the Class 10a or domestic shed/ garage construction and manufacturing industry. What are solar absorptance, reflectivity, gloss levels, heat transfer calculations, R Values, BASIX Scale, BCA Scale, and visual acceptability? All these factors play a role in the decision of colour choice (or ZINCALUME ®) of your shed metal cladding and roofing.

The standard by each authority vary and will cause some problems within the industry along with questions for the Building Certifier during the approval process. These variations on the choice of colour may affect the outcome of approval depending on which code is followed and whether or not the local council regulations agree or disagree with these codes.

Why is there a contradiction among something on coloured steel cladding when each colour has its own Solar Absorption Index Value? The reason for this is simple – each building (Class 10a) should be inspected individually prior to this decision of colour being made, to evaluate the different aspects of the codes above and the influence each requirement has on the following:

  • Visual Suitability (impact on neighbours)
  • Environmental Considerations (energy saving)
  • Personal choice (What colour you want?)
  • Building use (aspects of comfort levels within the building)
  • Building position (in reference to location of other building and aspect of sunlight etc)
  • Local Council requirements (necessary for approval)

 

Shedeye Reflectivity Scale Comparison Chart

 

Colour Colour Solar Absorption SEPP Classification BCA Classification BASIX Classification
STEEL COLOURS
Classic Cream ™ 0.31 Not Acceptable VL L
Surf Mist ® 0.318 Not Acceptable VL L
Paperbark ® 0.421 Not Acceptable VL L
Evening Haze ® 0.427 Not Acceptable L L
Shale Grey ™ 0.433 Not Acceptable L L
Sandbank ® 0.455 Not Acceptable L L
Dune ® 0.466 Not Acceptable L L
Windspray ® 0.584 Acceptable D M
Pale Eucalypt ® 0.597 Acceptable D M
Bushland ® 0.619 Acceptable D M
Headland ® 0.632 Acceptable D M
Wilderness ® 0.651 Acceptable D M
Jasper ® 0.682 Acceptable D M
Manor Red ® 0.688 Acceptable D M
Woodland Grey ® 0.706 Acceptable D D
Loft ® 0.711 Acceptable D D
Monument ® 0.732 Acceptable D D
Ironstone ® 0.743 Acceptable D D
Cottage Green ® 0.746 Acceptable D D
Deep Ocean ® 0.749 Acceptable D D
PLAIN
Zinalume ® ? 0.35 Not Acceptable VL L
METALLIC
Citi ® ? 0.55 Not Acceptable L M
Axis ® ? 0.55 Not Acceptable L M
Conservatory ® ? 0.55 Not Acceptable L M
Skybridge ® ? 0.55 Not Acceptable L M
Cortex ® > 0.55 Acceptable D M
Facade ® > 0.70 Acceptable D D
COOLMAX
Whitehaven ™ Not Acceptable VL L

 

As this spreadsheet describes the colours taken from the BlueScope website and lists four factors that are currently used in the building industry. How these play a part in colour choice for metal cladding on these buildings requires an understanding of each of the columns above. There are as follow:

  • Column 1. This is simply the list of ColorBond Colours, ZINCALUME and Metallic Colours from BlueScope.
  • Column 2. The Solar Absorption is simply a numerical index that shows the amount of solar “radiation” that is absorbed by that particular colour. This is not to be confused with reflectivity and the two are not inversely proportional to each other.
  • Column 3. SEPP is the body of government in NSW that has legislated the requirements of colour to be used in Class 10a buildings. The requirement is based on reflectivity and although not exactly stipulated – it only accepts Medium or Dark colours (low reflectivity).
  • Column 4. BCA has its own version of classification of colours in this list and refers to Very Light (VL), Light (L) and Dark (D).
  • Column 5. BASIX is the New South Wales Building and Sustainability Index body with its own colour classification and is as follows: Light (L), Medium (M) and Dark (D).

 

BASIX Solar Absorptance Scale

The BASIX scale is based on the following and is linked directly to the value of solar absorption index.

This can be located at http://www.basix.nsw.gov.au/docs/ under Thermal Comfort Protocols.


The Building Code of Australia (BCA) Colour Classification.

BCA has classified roof colour also on the basis of their solar absorptance, and referred simply as light, very light and dark. Very light is below 0.425 solar absorptance, Light is below 0.550 solar absorptance and Dark is above 0.550.

 

SEPP Colour Acceptance Scale.

This is quite simply stated as must be “low reflective material”. Being low reflective can only be Dark on the BCA Scale or Medium and Dark on the BASIX Scale. For the purpose of this investigation – the BCA scale has been used as this code is generally utilised by all local councils and Building Certifiers. The problem is not the cut off area – but simply in the statement of “low reflective material”.


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Garden shed exempt developments

Posted on : March 29, 2011

NSW SEPP for Exempt Developments for steel Garden Sheds

Shedeye has attempted to simplify the legislation around exempt Garden shed developments, not sure if we have, by creating a hopefully easy to follow flow chart.

Please click on the image for a larger view.

 

There is still some ambiguity in some of the legislations, for example what does low reflectivity mean?  Logic dictates that it means that you can not use zincalume in a residential setting (the classic tin shed), however what about the lightest of the colorbond (TM) colours, Classic Cream (TM)*, it has the highest reflectivity (the lowest solar absorption) with a Building Code of Australia (BCA) rating of very light.  If this is not allowed, a good quarter of Australian sheds would be in breach!

For an overview of the rules and regulations in regard to sheds, carports and garages click here.

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Shed Prices Rise, again!

Posted on : February 22, 2011

Just when you think that there can be no more steel shed price rises, you can think again, shed prices are on the rise again, and the steel manufacturers have stated that there are some more significant rises to come in 2011.

Shedeye showed that the January shed price rise was insignificant and for a standard 6 meters wide * 6 meters long * 2.4 meters high shed or garage you were in for less than a hundred dollars shed price increase.

The March price rise is set to hit the shed price a great deal more as it will directly impact the price of everything excluding colorbond products (January only effected colorbond products)

The list of effected products are

  • TrueCore – Roof Battens
  • Galvanised – Formwork, Accessories, Purlins
  • Zincalume – Roof and Wall Sheeting, Accessories, Top Hats, Flashings, Downpipes and Gutters.

The average price rise is approximately 10% and as these products make up most of the weight of a shed, you are going to see bigger shed prices or garage prices after March.  The shed price is all about the weight of steel that is used to construct them.

As has been previously shown Bluescope has a virtual monopoly within the shed industry, and the question needs to be asked,  is Australia paying too much for its steel sheds as a result?

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8 of 10 – Things You Must Know Before Buying A Shed or Garage!

Posted on : August 30, 2010

What Type Of Look Do You Want In Your Shed or Garage?

For custom built sheds there are over 500,000 different colour combinations using the standard Colorbound(TM) colours.  Combine the different materials and components and you have millions of unique configurations.

The number one biggest problem with new shed purchases is the colour selection, either incorrectly ordered, or incorrectly researched.  Choose wisely and triple check you are getting what you want as you’ll have to live with the colour once the shed arrives

The cladding you choose can be a standard corrugated (curved) surface, a square look or a combination of the both.

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