Cheap Sheds – How much do they cost?

Posted on : January 9, 2015

What makes a cheap shed?

The old saying you get what you pay for is definitely true for Sheds.  There are shed companies that will cut corners (the key removing as much steel as possible – the lighter the shed the cheaper it will be) and then there are those that will not compromise.  There are strict regulations and building guidelines stipulated in the BCA (Building Code of Australia) but like all products there are those that will do the absolute minimum to meet the standards and there are those that pride themselves in exceeding them and creating excellent products.

So why should you care?  Some of these shortcuts will translate to a reduction in quality, watch out for the following

  • You might get 0.40 TCT on the roof sheet  – that is in this case a 0.40mm thick Total Coated Thickness or the equivalent of 0.35mm BMT (Base Metal Thickness). So this is 0.07mm thinner than the normal roof sheeting that should be installed for a domestic shed. It’s cheaper and many people don’t know the difference!  This thickness of steel is easily damaged and usually can’t be walked on.  You can find more detail on the difference here.
  • There are three major types of sheds and all of these will have different pricing (C-Section is usually the cheapest).
    • Cold Rollformed portal frame shed (constructed using C-Section steel).   This is what the largest manufacturers usually provide and are usually limited to a span of 18 meters.
    • Structural fabricated steel shed (constructed using H section, I beam or C channel).  This type of shed has a high strength joining system and while it can be assembled more quickly it usually reserved for greater than 18 meter spans.
    • Steel  Stud framed sheds.  These are identical to the steel stud framing used in housing.  This has an advantage of providing additional internal area over C-Section construction.
  • Sheds cost more if you buy them on finance, see the article here for more information
  • Is the steel imported or from a local steel manufacturer.  The line is getting blurred here as the likes of BlueScope have massive manufacturing capacity overseas now.  The question should probably be changed to “has the steel be tested to meet Australian standards”.  Not all steel is of the same quality as can be seen here.
  • Some shed packs are complex to put together and will cost more to erect (often the cheaper sheds).
  • There are lots of additional tricks (and sometimes costly mistakes) that will save steel and reduce the price.

Please beware and make sure that you understand the difference when buying a shed, as not all sheds are the same!

Now to the cheapest of the cheap, accurate as of the 1/2/2015.  These have been sourced from various companies providing portal frame sheds (C-Section) that are known within the industry to have the cheapest sheds and garages.  Note that these prices do not include delivery, erection, windows, personal doors, insulation or automatic door mechanism or plans in some cases!  In addition, they do not advertise what components they are using or what wind rating they are rated too, so this could go up significantly if you are in a high wind zone or an area that can get snow.

Caution: These are advertised prices without much about the actual components in addition this does not include buidling, you must see the detailed shed specification before you can make a true and accurate comparision.

 

Single Garage Cheap Prices

with Roller Door 2200h x 2770w or 2500h x 2770w 

 $2,400 : $2,730 – 3.6 meters x 7 meters x 2.4 meters high

$2,600 : $2,900 – 4.2 meters x 7 meters x 2.4 meters high

$3370 : $3,710 – 4.2 meters x 9 meters x 3.0 meters high

Double Garage Cheap Prices

with 2 x Roller Door 2200h x 2770w or 2500h x 2770w 

 $2,950 : $3,415 – 6 meters x 6 meters x 2.4 meters high

$3,650 : $4,060 – 6 meters x 7 meters x 3 meters high

$5440 : $5,950 – 7 meters x 10 meters x 3.0 meters high

There is no doubt these prices are from internationally sourced steel, just remember that you must compare quote for quote and all details must be included so you can fairly compare.  Do not buy the shed until you have seen the detailed specification of your shed or garage.  Not to mention you will want good service as often components will be missing or damaged.  Lesser shed companies will have one out of every ten sheds with damaged or missing parts, you need a distributor that provides great service when things go wrong.

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Steel shed price Rise

Posted on : September 19, 2011

Steel Price Rise Due in next 3 to 7 Weeks

BlueScope Distribution has notified customers of an impending two tier price rise in the coming weeks. It involves a base steel rise of between $60 to $120 per tonne on most product groups. As well they will be implementing specific surcharges to recoup key costs. These surcharges will be provided shortly.

 

Steel Shed Prices will rise with Australian Steel?

 

This comes after a significant bonus of over $3 million was paid to Key BlueScope Management (11 people) as a reward for leadership – not profit incentive? The notification states that volitilty in steel prices, rising labour costs, rising freight costs, rising processing costs, rising warehouse costs, and a rise in general utilities are the reasons. Along with the iron ore and coal price increase that has caused the steel price rise – the others will be included in the additional surcharges.

They state they have begun to receive notice from their steel suppliers (BlueScope Steel) of pending price increases. This does not look good for further sales of BlueScope Steel in the shed industry. With imports on the rise at cheaper prices currently – this price rise will further erode steel sales by BlueScope.

It will also follow by a notification by One Steel on its price increase – so many of the big shed manufacturers will be importing direct to keep competitive in the shed industry. Many of the big reseller shed companies will want to lock in prices for as long as possible to avoid this increase. Negotiations are already occurring between some of the big rollformers and BlueScope, along with talks between rollformers and shed companies.

 

Have you been told of this price rise?

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Alternative to the CO2 Carbon Tax for the Steel Industry

Posted on : July 18, 2011

The current development of furnaces for steel manufacturing is changing – but not in Australia. BlueScope and One Steel cannot compete with the giants in Asia, USA, India and Europe.

The answer is a non coal fired furnace – called an Electric Arc Furnace – the images below are copied from mainly sites in China and India. The use electricity to produce molten iron used every day in the steel industry.

 

Electric Arc Furnace

Electric Arc Furnace Diagram

Electric Arc Furnace 2

Electric Arc Furnace 3

As you can see this is not dissimilar to providing the required temperatures to liquefy Iron Ore Oxide to Iron (steel) plus lots of other very technical processes. But the great thing about this it reduces the CO2 emissions by 50% plus (to be confirmed) but the source of power is excluded in this exercise. All of Chinese, Indian, American and European Steel producers are going down this avenue. It will become the dominating source of steel while the CO2 emissions are a problem to the globe. Why is Australia not looking at this technology – because coal is cheaper than the extremely high power charges already being charged? With the introduction of the Carbon Tax on Power Stations and Steel Manufacture – this technology will not be available to Australia and we will become the third world manufacturers (polluters of CO2) and eventually shut majority of these manufacturing companies down.

WHY? Because power is already expensive and will become more so with the CO2 Tax Introduction. How does Australia make power? The majority is coal and the government will make a fortune in revenue from this CO2 Tax along all supply lines. Why would they invest in alternate sources of power that do not produce any CO2? Because there isn’t a tax on it yet! What is this magical power supply that doesn’t emit any CO2?

 

Nuclear Power Stations

The below is a photo of a power station in Europe (includes Russia) that are simply producing large amounts of energy without the CO2 poisoning of the atmosphere.

Nuclear power plant

How do these magic power stations work – people in Australia haven’t seen one here because they are banned and will be for a long time with the sentiment that has been placed in this country since the early 1970’s. Nuclear Energy is very different from Nuclear Bombs! Have a look at the world today that uses nuclear power.

 

 

 

 

 

Nuclear power plant usage

 

The grey areas (that include Australia) have no reactors – WHY? Because of the fear that we will all die if something goes wrong. Nearly 40% of the world’s landmass population has access to nuclear power! We don’t and will not until there is a big shift in the acceptance by the Australian public of this power source.  If education is the key – then lobby groups from manufacturing industries will have to provide the input to start this process.

 

Australia Needs Affordable Power to Sustain its Economic Viability in Steel Manufacturing.

How can BlueScope and One Steel change (or even afford to research and develop) to this new technology? The simple answer is they will not. The CO2 Tax has just wiped it off the R&D board’s agenda at the annual production sustainability meeting. Australia cannot supply power for this process without utilising coal or gas. Wind, Solar, Geothermal, Wave and other renewable power supplies don’t compete with the economical supply of base load power that exists in Nuclear Power Supply.

Australia says on one hand – don’t use Nuclear power – but then says you pollute too much CO2 into the atmosphere – what are the steel companies going to do? Unlike TATA and other world steel giants they can’t use nuclear power from companies in China like the CHINA GUANGDONG NUCLEAR POWER COMPANY which supplies fuel (uranium fuel cells) to all of Chinas nuclear Power Stations. Where does the China Guangdong Nuclear Power Company get its Uranium Ore from? ANSWER is Australia. Aren’t we very clever? Sell it but don’t use it! The next good part of the story is that Energy Metals a 60.6% Chinese / Australian company was just granted a licence to export uranium from the Northern Territory to China for the next ten years.

 

WHY?

The questions raised are:

  • We can sell uranium for nuclear power but not to Australian companies for power production in Australia.
  • Over 50% ownership (by other countries) of uranium mines is allowed in Australia and they can sell it to whoever they want.
  • Nuclear power is very bad in Australia – but so is coal – we have to use wind, solar etc.
  • Cheap power, no CO2 polluting power (nuclear) and cheap, CO2 polluting power (coal) is not an option in Australia because one is banned and the other is taxed till it is no longer affordable.
  • How will the big manufacturers in steel, cement aluminium etc afford to develop new technology or even adapt to new technology if this CO2 tax is introduced.
  • Will everyone accept cheaper imports of overseas manufactured steel product to utilise in building etc?

How many manufacturing groups, associations, industry groups, federations, lobby groups etc are actually interested in saving this steel industry? I will be publishing a list of each group involved directly or indirectly of their involvement to date and also their intended involvement including “no comment” over the next few weeks.

This industry employs (directly & indirectly) the vast majority of Australian workers and this Tax and also the Ban on Nuclear Power will leave us behind.

I will leave you with two images – pick which ones are Australia and which one is China?

Australia

 

 

China

 

Where do we want to be in 100 years? 500 years? China is planning for the end of 3000 not 2012 like Australia.

Here’s the roofing perspective of all this – maybe pictures are easier to see the comparison?

The big question is which one is Australia and which one is China? A or B?

Picture A

Picture B

 

Email your answer to shed@shedeye.com.au and also if you require further technical data regarding this report or an RSS feed setup to your email address?

All industry Associations, Federations, Lobby Groups, Institutes or other interested parties please leave contact details at the above address.

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Shed of the Year 2011

Posted on : July 13, 2011

A music shed owned by John Earl of Clevedon N Somerset in UK won the much prized glory of winning The Shed of The Year 2011 from some very strong opposition. Even though it’s only 10 foot X 12 foot – this shed has become famous to music fans the world over. To date over 1,000 musicians have had their songs videoed in this shed.

The Music Shed - Winner 2011

This competition is drawing entries from around the world and has many different categories. Also Australia has been well represented each year – but to date no success with any prizes.

The full story can be seen here with many other sheds that didn’t win.

Here’s another Australian entry that is amazing – how did they fit all the stuff inside?

Inside ManBower’s Shed, Sydney

Outside of ManBower's Shed, Sydney

It would be good to see this level of enthusiasm for shed competitions in Australia.

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Shed – $5 million for 100 sqm!

Posted on : June 30, 2011

This shed in 2008 was the most expensive property in Australia – wonder if it still is?

The 100 square meter old tram shed at Cremorne Point was bought in 2001 for $780,000 and converted to a house by the owner several years later – see the news article.

It had stood vacant from 1991 until this sale transformed it to Australia’s most valuable property which is now rented. It overlooks Syndey Harbour with views of the Syndey Harbour Bridge.

$50,000 per Square Meter

Mr Gilmour, the head of Huntingdale Properties, is currently looking to rent his unique home.
He said living there had been wonderful but his family had now outgrown the house.

Even Mum, Dad and one child would be squashed in 100 sqaure meters.

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Reflecting on Reflectivity

Posted on : April 6, 2011

Shedeye has questioned the ambiguity of the SEPP definition of “low reflectivity” and is going to expand more on this.  This article will explain the standards and map them to each other.  For a complete discussion go to the Shedeye Investigator  article.

The current requirements of reflectivity standards of metal cladding as seen in BASIX, BCA and SEPP all seem too ambiguous for correct applications and on site judgement and analysis. As explained below, the variations of each of these regulatory bodies will be apparent especially in the Class 10a or domestic shed/ garage construction and manufacturing industry. What are solar absorptance, reflectivity, gloss levels, heat transfer calculations, R Values, BASIX Scale, BCA Scale, and visual acceptability? All these factors play a role in the decision of colour choice (or ZINCALUME ®) of your shed metal cladding and roofing.

The standard by each authority vary and will cause some problems within the industry along with questions for the Building Certifier during the approval process. These variations on the choice of colour may affect the outcome of approval depending on which code is followed and whether or not the local council regulations agree or disagree with these codes.

Why is there a contradiction among something on coloured steel cladding when each colour has its own Solar Absorption Index Value? The reason for this is simple – each building (Class 10a) should be inspected individually prior to this decision of colour being made, to evaluate the different aspects of the codes above and the influence each requirement has on the following:

  • Visual Suitability (impact on neighbours)
  • Environmental Considerations (energy saving)
  • Personal choice (What colour you want?)
  • Building use (aspects of comfort levels within the building)
  • Building position (in reference to location of other building and aspect of sunlight etc)
  • Local Council requirements (necessary for approval)

 

Shedeye Reflectivity Scale Comparison Chart

 

Colour Colour Solar Absorption SEPP Classification BCA Classification BASIX Classification
STEEL COLOURS
Classic Cream ™ 0.31 Not Acceptable VL L
Surf Mist ® 0.318 Not Acceptable VL L
Paperbark ® 0.421 Not Acceptable VL L
Evening Haze ® 0.427 Not Acceptable L L
Shale Grey ™ 0.433 Not Acceptable L L
Sandbank ® 0.455 Not Acceptable L L
Dune ® 0.466 Not Acceptable L L
Windspray ® 0.584 Acceptable D M
Pale Eucalypt ® 0.597 Acceptable D M
Bushland ® 0.619 Acceptable D M
Headland ® 0.632 Acceptable D M
Wilderness ® 0.651 Acceptable D M
Jasper ® 0.682 Acceptable D M
Manor Red ® 0.688 Acceptable D M
Woodland Grey ® 0.706 Acceptable D D
Loft ® 0.711 Acceptable D D
Monument ® 0.732 Acceptable D D
Ironstone ® 0.743 Acceptable D D
Cottage Green ® 0.746 Acceptable D D
Deep Ocean ® 0.749 Acceptable D D
PLAIN
Zinalume ® ? 0.35 Not Acceptable VL L
METALLIC
Citi ® ? 0.55 Not Acceptable L M
Axis ® ? 0.55 Not Acceptable L M
Conservatory ® ? 0.55 Not Acceptable L M
Skybridge ® ? 0.55 Not Acceptable L M
Cortex ® > 0.55 Acceptable D M
Facade ® > 0.70 Acceptable D D
COOLMAX
Whitehaven ™ Not Acceptable VL L

 

As this spreadsheet describes the colours taken from the BlueScope website and lists four factors that are currently used in the building industry. How these play a part in colour choice for metal cladding on these buildings requires an understanding of each of the columns above. There are as follow:

  • Column 1. This is simply the list of ColorBond Colours, ZINCALUME and Metallic Colours from BlueScope.
  • Column 2. The Solar Absorption is simply a numerical index that shows the amount of solar “radiation” that is absorbed by that particular colour. This is not to be confused with reflectivity and the two are not inversely proportional to each other.
  • Column 3. SEPP is the body of government in NSW that has legislated the requirements of colour to be used in Class 10a buildings. The requirement is based on reflectivity and although not exactly stipulated – it only accepts Medium or Dark colours (low reflectivity).
  • Column 4. BCA has its own version of classification of colours in this list and refers to Very Light (VL), Light (L) and Dark (D).
  • Column 5. BASIX is the New South Wales Building and Sustainability Index body with its own colour classification and is as follows: Light (L), Medium (M) and Dark (D).

 

BASIX Solar Absorptance Scale

The BASIX scale is based on the following and is linked directly to the value of solar absorption index.

This can be located at http://www.basix.nsw.gov.au/docs/ under Thermal Comfort Protocols.


The Building Code of Australia (BCA) Colour Classification.

BCA has classified roof colour also on the basis of their solar absorptance, and referred simply as light, very light and dark. Very light is below 0.425 solar absorptance, Light is below 0.550 solar absorptance and Dark is above 0.550.

 

SEPP Colour Acceptance Scale.

This is quite simply stated as must be “low reflective material”. Being low reflective can only be Dark on the BCA Scale or Medium and Dark on the BASIX Scale. For the purpose of this investigation – the BCA scale has been used as this code is generally utilised by all local councils and Building Certifiers. The problem is not the cut off area – but simply in the statement of “low reflective material”.


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The End of Steel Manufacturing in Australia

Posted on : March 6, 2011

Shedeye previously printed Shed Prices to go sky High, it was clear that the steel manufacturing sector in Australia is under serious threat with the introduction of a Carbon tax on the industry.  Shedeye then showed the cold hard science behind the Steel shed industry and carbon.  Shedeye also proposed that rather than a tax, perhaps all ozzies with the room in their back yards should plant a gumtree!

Bluescope has responded to the threat by sending media releases to both the smh.com.au as reported Bluescope seeks exemption for manufacturing and www.theaustralian.com.au as reported Carbon tax plan threatens viability.

BlueScopes Steel managing director has stated

“The test has to be: can the price be passed through . . . if the price is not paid through, it is basically the end of steel manufacturing in Australia,”

and

“For emissions-intensive trade-exposed industries there should be no cost until our competitors face a cost and there certainly shouldn’t be a free ride for imports that sees manufacturers have to move their operations offshore and hide carbon in someone else’s backyard.

If the manufacturing sector does not get an exemption is the government going to impose tariffs on imported steel?  What a mess.

While BlueScope is in the business of making money and this involves lobbying and looking out for their own interests before all else, this is a clear case of the general public’s best interest.

The industry is threatened via big increases in shed prices, the disposable income of Australians is in serious trouble and even when the government starts to allocate the funds from the carbon tax (inefficiently and no doubt misappropriated), the damage may well have been done.

 

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10 Things You Must Know Before Buying A Shed or Garage!

Posted on : September 7, 2010

Download The Complete Article…


1. What Is The Height Of The Vehicle That You Are Going To Put Into The Shed or Garage?

The rule of thumb is that you will lose about 500 millimetres of clearance on the advertised Roller door height.  You can get a bit more height if you choose a gable entry over a side wall.

This is a very important consideration, as the height of your shed and the size of the roller door are contingent on the height of your vehicle.  There’s no point in buying a shed or garage only to find out that your boat or 4WD won’t fit in there because the shed roof is too low.  It’s vital that you take the proper measurements before you even go looking for a shed or garage.

Make sure you confirm your measurements and the amount of clearance your shed or garage will have with your local distributor.

2.  How To Get Finance For Your New Shed?

Before you consider finance through the shed or finance company, do your sums first, if you pay for the shed in cash; you can often negotiate a much better deal.

If you don’t have enough cash to pay for the shed outright, what can you do?

It may be cheaper overall to either get a personal loan or use the equity from your home so you can pay for the shed in cash and get a cheaper price than going through a finance company as you may have to pay establishment fees on top of the price of the shed.

Some shed finance companies can provide finance for the building and concrete as well, but it will depend on your financial circumstances – how much your income and assets are and how much debt you have.

Some shed companies provide consumers with interest free finance.  You can pay fortnightly or monthly through direct debit or credit card payments.  Once you receive delivery of the shed, your payment plan will commence.  But again, somebody is paying for the finance, usually through a more expensive purchase price, there is no such thing as a free shed after all!

3.  Are You In A Snow Loading Area?

If your property has an altitude of over 600 metres above sea level, it’s a legal requirement in Australia that your shed has a snow loading allowance built into the structural design.

It’s vital that you find out if you’re in a snow loading area as you need your shed to be strong enough to stand up to the weather conditions in your area, including ice and snow.  When looking at sheds, you can ask the distributor if their sheds have been calculated for snow loading.

Snow loading will also affect the required pitch of your roof, this means that you are going to need a pitch of at least 10 degrees upwards, depending on where you are located.

Remember, it’s important to consult with your local council first for snow loading requirements based on the Australian Standard 1170.3.


4.  Are You In A Wind Prone Area?

Simply ask your local council and your local shed distributor, it is too complicated to work out.

It is too hard to work out on your own as is based on the probable maximum wind speed in your region, if your site is on a hill or escarpment, if your site is located in suburbia or rural and the size and importance of the shed.

If you are in a wind prone area, the shed design needs to be stronger with more steel and will cost more.  This expense is a must otherwise your shed will blow down and will be a risk to yourself and others.

You will also have to check with the shed company to make sure the shed is strong enough to tolerate your area’s wind rating.  Your local shed distributor should know if you live in a wind prone area and what wind rating your shed needs to have.

As always, it’s essential that you check with your local council first before buying and installing your shed.  For a comprehensive analysis of the wind ratings take a look at the Steel Shed Groups publication Wind Actions on Steel Sheds and Garages (http://www.steel.org.au/_uploads/429_Wind_Actions_Steel_Sheds_2009.pdf)


5.  Are You Going To Build Your Shed Yourself?

You can save yourself a fortune building your own shed, however the bigger the shed the harder it is to erect.  Approximately 50% of all Sheds built in suburbia are owner built.

Are you going to build the shed yourself or are you going to hire concreters, shed erectors and plumbers?  You can save money by erecting the shed yourself, but if you’re not a handy person or don’t have any friends who are, you may be better off hiring experts who can install it for you and save you a big headache, as well as a lot of time.

The shed company you buy the shed or garage from may be able to provide you with their own contractors for erecting the shed, or give you the names of contractors.

The terms vary according to local councils (you MUST check them) however if the building is under $5,000 then you may be able to build without an owner-builder permit, depending on your local council.

If the building structure is over $12,000 then you need to apply for a Certificate of Consent.  This allows you to get a building permit and undertake your own building work as an owner-builder.

But it’s important you check with your local council first.  Some councils will require you to apply for a building permit (different to an owner-builder permit) in order to erect a shed.  If the structure is larger than 10 square metres in area, then the law requires you to get a building permit.

Theoretically you can never do plumbing work yourself as it‘s illegal; it needs to be conducted by a licensed plumber.


6.  Make Sure You Get Council Approval For Your Structure!

The variation between councils is great however there are a handful of situations where you do not need council approval and there are some limitations you need to be aware of.

  • Some councils do not require approval if the shed is smaller than 3 meters in width and 3 meters in height.
  • Some councils will allow the shed to be on the boundary while other councils will demand the shed to be situated at least 2 metres away with walkways .
  • Some councils will not allow certain shed colours due to the restrictions on the reflection of light and location aesthetics.
  • Some councils will not allow a shed if there is less than a certain percentage of land available on the block.

Just remember to check everything with your local council first!

This is generally what happens when you buy a shed or garage:

1)      You choose the kind of shed you want.

2)      You find a shed distributor you’re happy with.

3)      You decide how you’re going to finance the shed.

4)      You receive an engineering report from the shed distributor.

5)      You submit the engineering report to your local council, as well as an application for permission to build the shed.

6)      You receive advice from council whether your application is approved or not.

7)      If your application is approved, you can go ahead with your shed or garage.


7. When Do You Want The Shed Or Garage?

For custom built sheds, don’t count on parking the car in you new shed for 4-6 weeks from the time you make your decision to buy.

1)      It takes 3-5 weeks delivery time for the kit shed.

2)      It takes a day to pour the slab  (if you are getting a slab and not just footings)

3)      It takes a couple of days for the slab to dry completely (depending on the size) before you erect the shed or garage.

4)      Add two days for professionals to erect the shed or garage depending on size (for a standard size shed).

All of the calculations are assuming experience professionals, for somebody who is not then it can take much, much longer!!

8.  What Type Of Look Do You Want In Your Shed or Garage?

For custom built sheds there are over 500,000 different colour combinations using the standard Colorbound(TM) colours.  Combine the different materials and components and you have millions of unique configurations.

The number one biggest problem with new shed purchases is the colour selection, either incorrectly ordered, or incorrectly researched.  Choose wisely and triple check you are getting what you want as you’ll have to live with the colour once the shed arrives

The cladding you choose can be a standard corrugated (curved) surface, a square look or a combination of the both.

9.  Do You Want A Steel, Wood or Plastic Shed or Garage?

Steel sheds are the most versatile and affordable product in the market place.

Plastic sheds are usually only suitable for smaller sheds.  Wood sheds and garages are usually twice as expensive (installed) than the steel shed or garage equivalent.  You do have more variation in the styles by using wood, however given Australia’s termite problems, steel is a great option.

10.  Remember That Shedeye Can Help You Design Your Shed

Save up to 2 hours in shed and garage research, and filling out quotes by using the innovative web tool, www.shedeye.com.au.  100% free, always.

Shedeye was designed to allow you to visualise your shed, making it as close as possible to reality.  It also saves you hours by taking out the hassle of trawling through numerous shed sites, individually replicating the details of the shed your required.  A great online resource for designing, getting quotes and comparing sheds and garages.

www.shedeye.com.au

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9 of 10 – Things You Must Know Before Buying A Shed or Garage!

Posted on : September 4, 2010

Do You Want A Steel, Wood or Plastic Shed or Garage?

Steel sheds are the most versatile and affordable product in the market place.

Plastic sheds are usually only suitable for smaller sheds.  Wood sheds and garages are usually twice as expensive (installed) than the steel shed or garage equivalent.  You do have more variation in the styles by using wood, however given Australia’s termite problems, steel is a great option.

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3 of 10 – Things You Must Know Before Buying A Shed or Garage!

Posted on : August 22, 2010

Are You In A Snow Loading Area?

If your property has an altitude of over 600 metres above sea level, it’s a legal requirement in Australia that your shed has a snow loading allowance built into the structural design.

It’s vital that you find out if you’re in a snow loading area as you need your shed to be strong enough to stand up to the weather conditions in your area, including ice and snow.  When looking at sheds, you can ask the distributor if their sheds have been calculated for snow loading.

Snow loading will also affect the required pitch of your roof, this means that you are going to need a pitch of at least 10 degrees upwards, depending on where you are located.

Remember, it’s important to consult with your local council first for snow loading requirements based on the Australian Standard 1170.3.

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