Shed – eye for detail.

Posted on : October 14, 2012

Sheds come in different types

The majority of sheds sold today in Australia are of the portal frame design and the components are what is called cold rollformed. But there are two other important types of shed construction that is becoming more popular, the structural steel frame and the stud frame sheds. This is a quick rundown on the three different types:

 

1. Cold rollformed portal frame shed.

This is the most common type of shed and is normally supplied pre-engineered and in a kit form. The main structure (called the portal frame) consists of rolled purlins, girts, batton, top hat and brackets. The cladding and flashings are common to all types.

 

Portal frame showing apex and knee brackets

Portal frame showing apex and knee brackets

As you can see the basic prinicple is that all the purlins (both rafters and colums) consist of cold rolled C section joined by fabricated brackets that bolt each assembly together. The roof and wall members are added once all the portal frames have been stood. This is a very efficient system that can be transported easily and assembled on site with minimal tools. 

 

2. Structural fabricated steel shed.

 Nearly the same engineering prinicple as number 1 – except all the colums and rafters are from hot rolled section such as H section, I beam, or C channels with welded cleats and joiners on all ends. All other components are normally the same. The advantage of this type of design is for larger spans especially used in large warehouse constructions and normally over 18 meter width.
Structural steel is a bolt together design with heavy structural steel

The structural steel is heavy to transport but does allow faster erection and extremely high strength joining system. All the other components are very similar.

 

3. Steel stud framed sheds.

 Now this is completely different to the above two. It is identical to the steel stud framing used in housing and results in a very strong overall construction. The walls and trusses are all prefabicated in sections and simply stood on site and then clad. The advantage of this system is the ease of which you finish the sheeting internally and is the reason it is gaining popularity. 

Steel stud frame shed

As you can see there are no colums protruding into the interior and all window and door penetrations are done at fabrication stage. While slightly more to transport – the erection time is greatly reduced and the finish (interior) allows much cheaper cladding solutions. It can be treated in the same way as a normal house frame. 

 

Not all sheds are the same, and to ensure you obtain one that suits your purpose contact Shedeye.

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Sheds & Guns!

Posted on : July 26, 2012

Shed has more history than the Museum!

The newly restored shed at DownsSteam Railway and Museum is for the use of volunteers to work on the LOCO 106 “Pride of Toowoomba” which hopefully will be finished in 2015 for the locos 100th birthday!

William Boden and Tom Redwood are two of many volunteers who have helped get the new restoration shed at DownsSteam Railway and Museum up and ready for the opening on Saturday. Photo Dave Noonan

The full article concerning the shed and train museum is in the Toowoomba Chronicle on 19th July 2012. From the article the shed had many uses prior to its current use – and the original shed was purchased for use as an aircraft hanger at Oakey in Queensland (not far from Toowoomba)! The shed is not that special – except it was made in America in 1942 and shipped to Australia for use in the war period. The history of the shed is amazing – it was fabricated by Bethlehem Steel in Pennsylvania in 1942 nearly 70 years ago and with a huge effort of a design drawn up by USQ School of Engineering students, the shed was able to be reconstructed after many years lying at the old Bridge St quarry!

Now for the history the steel of this shed shares:  Bethlehem Steel in Pennsylvania was America’s second largest company that started in 1857 and finally filed for bankruptcy in 2001 and all assets sold. During the 1940’s it employed some 300,000 workers with 180,000 alone in the steel ship building sector. Coincidence is that Bethlehem Steel produced this railway gun and also the shed in Toowoomba that houses a railway museum. This particular gun is now in a museum in Brazil:

“Bethlehem 177” railway gun on display at Museum Militar Conde de Linhares

Along with this spectacular piece – Bethlehem Steel in Pennsylvania was producing one naval vessel per day – which totalled 1,121 ships which was more than any other builder in the war period.

6″, 10″, 12″, and 14″ naval guns being assembled at a Bethlehem Steel facility

So this company that made the Toowoomba shed also produce huge numbers of naval and army guns at the same time, How did it manage to fit in such a small (by comparison) order for an aircraft hanger at Oakey in Queensland. Well it will be an interesting tour of the Downs Steam Railway and Museum not only looking at the 100 year old “Pride of Toowoomba” locomotive, but seeing the 70 year old steel fabricated at the same time as thousands of guns, ships and icons in America. One like this one – that Bethlehem Steel supplied most of the steel for the cable cars and tracks – always it comes back to TRAINS!

Steel for the “San Francisco Municipal Railway” system came from Bethlehem Steel!

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Giant Cattle Shed.

Posted on : June 15, 2012

New cattle sale yards at Scone to be covered!

These cattle yards are at Scone and Upper Hunter, the saleyards are already considered among the 10 best facilities in New South Wales and are currently receiving tender to construct roofing over the facilities. Here are the details for the tender:

Upper Hunter Shire Council Tender – Design and Construction of Roof Over Part Of The Scone & Upper Hunter Regional Saleyards (NSW)
Tenders are invited from appropriately qualified and experienced contractors for the following tender
Tender No 05i2011 – Design and Construction of roof over part of the Scone & Upper Hunter Regional Saleyards including water harvesting and lighting
Initial roof area of approximately 2376sqm with possible secondary stage of 3.158 being a total area of 5.535sqm
Tender documents for Tender No 05/2011 will be available in electronic format only Interested contractors can register their details at Council’s et endenng portal http i!wwwtenderlink co/upperhunter to download the tender documentation
Site inspection arrangements and any enquiries relating to the proposed contract should be directed to Council’s l1anager Technical Support Services
Coleen Pinkerton on 026540 1115 or
Email c pinkerton@upperhunter, nsw gov au
The closing date & time for tender submissions is 4pm Friday 29 June 2012 Tenders will not be accepted after this time
Daryl Dutton
General Manager
Closing Date 29-06-2012
Source The Sydney Morning Herald Tuesday May 22. 2012

The roof area for this giant shed is in two parts and covers nearly 5,500 plus square meters. Still small in comparison to some of the giant cattle yards around Australia. A very large one – the Carcoar Saleyards have some impressive statistics mentioned below: These facts come from their website CTLX Facilities.

  • The sheep pavilion roof is 224m long and 82m wide, and the cattle pavilion 144m long and 109m wide.
  • The roofs are clad with site manufactured Aramax sheet which was developed in Carcoar, and is manufactured by Brice Engineers. 
  • The cattle pavilion roof sheets are believed to be the longest single length sheets manufactured and erected anywhere in the world. 
  • The 15,600 square metre cattle pavilion roof was manufactured and erected in ten days.

The sheeting also looks like aluminium as Zinc Alum and Colorbond are not suitable for this type of animal enclosure. See the Intensive Animal Farming Technical Bulletin CTB-22. It was manufactured by Brice Engineering and is marketed under the name of Aramax – they are now owned by Fielders Steel and their website is Fielders Aramax. Here’s a snap of the sales yard at Carcoar:

Carcoar Sales Yards - Aramax Roofing

Shed building on a giant scale – it’s good to see the commercial and industrial side of metal sheds still travelling in the right direction.

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Shed Cyclonic Regulations

Posted on : January 31, 2012

Shedeye Investigator – The Australian Story

Introduction

This discussion is broken into two points regarding LHL testing. The first is with a rollforming perspective, and the second from a shed manufacturing perspective.

The main aim is to generate discussion to educate and learn from the current regulations concerning LHL Standard Cyclic Test Method for Cyclonic Areas. It was officially phased in on the 30th April 2009 to meet the Building Code of Australia Specification B1.2.

Interpretation of Low-High-Low Cyclic (LHL) Testing

 Basically it is simulated wind conditions (cyclonic) method using low, the high, then low pressure sequence to test the wind loads on metal roof cladding in cyclonic conditions. This LHL test is considered better to represent typical cyclic regime on metal roof assemblies than the DABM test method that was in the Northern Territory and the Australian Standard AS4040.3:1999 test method previously used in Queensland and Western Australia. The test involves includes the roof assembly including the roof sheets, fasteners and the battens and their support fasteners.

From April 2009 all cladding and batten manufacturers need to demonstrate that their metal roofing assemblies specified for cyclonic areas of Australia have been tested using the LHL test method. More details are available in Technical Alert No 08/1 at www.eng.jcu.edu.au/cts .

Rollforming Manufacturer Perspective

So to understand the basic test of the roof assembly – each manufacturer must get their roof sheeting (all profiles specified for cyclonic regions) tested under LHL. There are numerous testing stations in Australia and the one chosen here for example only is the James Cook University Cyclone Testing Station. Also in this discussion the roof cladding type is corrugated – produced by all of the rollforming companies in Australia and also used in cyclonic regions in Australia. The LHL stipulates that for a company to sell corrugated roof sheets in cyclonic areas – it must undergo LHL cyclic testing. The BRAND corrugated roofing is sold by some of the big multinational rollformers throughout Australia. The Company here is Company ZZZ, and to comply it sends it corrugated roof sheeting to the cyclone testing centre to meet compliance to the LHL test. This sample is rollformed on one machine that converts the coil (flat sheet) to corrugated roof sheets. This is assembled with battens and fasteners then tested under LHL. Once the LHL tests have successfully completed Company ZZZ can then supply corrugated roof sheeting to all cyclone areas in Australia. Company ZZZ has numerous corrugated rollformers as well as the one that supplied the sheets for LHL testing and yet all the corrugated roof sheets are compliant to LHL.

By stipulating that the company brand of corrugated has to be LHL tested, they are accepting that all the corrugated rollformers held by that company are identical. For another company to provide corrugated roof sheets to cyclonic areas – they too have to complete LHL testing. This assumes that the profile and rollform machines are different from company to company. Those in the rollform industry know that this is not the case, and apart from some minor variations between machines it is the profile of corrugated (along with the feed coil properties) that determine the strength and its ability to undergo LHL test compliance. Yet Company XXX has to undergo LHL testing even though all its machines are identical to Company ZZZ machines. This is the only industry where identical products are testing not the manufacturing process.  The LHL testing should in fact be the responsibility of the rollform machine provider – and most of these (especially Australian and New Zealand machines) would all supply compliant corrugated roofing sheets. There should be compliance for these rollform machines to be registered to conform to LHL testing. Yet Company ZZZ who has gained LHL compliance for its rollform machines can buy a new corrugated rollformer from China that may not meet the standards previously obtained from its original sample material. It is the machine that makes the corrugated roof sheet and so testing of one machine from a multinational company will allow inferior product by the company utilising untested machines.

Shed Manufacturers Perspective

From a roll former’s point of view, if it can be demonstrated that structural roll formed products with the same girth and BMT thickness such as roof sheeting and top span that is identical in profile, and manufactured from the same coils of origin that have undergone the LHL testing criteria, what is the real purpose of having the product tested while there remains a question regarding the safety of the total structure? For example, the manufacturer of roll forming materials may argue that while the LHL testing applies only to the roof cladding and “immediate members” that support the roof cladding, failure to include the importance of the connections at the apex, knee, and tie downs, begs the question; how does the manufactured product miraculously become only when the supplier has had the immediate members tested in a wind tunnel that simulates cyclonic conditions?

It is in the real world where actual wind tunnels exist, moreover, regardless of whether the product has been endorsed by shedsafe, structures will continue to fail even before completion.  So concerned are the self appointed gatekeepers to the shed industry, they have aligned themselves with the BSA and other bodies in conducting seminars across the country, advising erectors how to construct sheds so as to avoid the structure  collapsing during construction.  Shed erectors are playing roulette at the hands of shedsafe’s smoking mirrors illusion, hence, the shed erector will be potentially at fault if it can be shown there was a failure on the erector’s part in failing to use his skills in making sure that the whole shed was acting as a diaphragm in order to hold it together in the event of a storm or freak wind that often collapses the frame during construction. In other words, wherever there is an accident on site during construction resulting in person(s) injured or killed, the shed erector, rather than those who endorsed the shedsafe product, will be liable.

Now for a comedic look at the situation.

 A recent inspection of a 3x3m garden shed is an example of the hypocrisy within the industry.

A Building inspector was recently surprised to notice that a garden shed structure was actually made from a .75 mm stud frame with 12mm tie downs at each stud, along with two extra 12mm tie down’s at each corner. He was further surprised to notice bracing on each wall and three 64mm top spans on the roof fastened with 12x 14×20 tek screws with 0.42BMT cladding properly secured to the top span, yet while he was surprised at the extent of the structure, given that most 3x3m garden sheds don’t have a frame at all, he nevertheless failed the inspection because the shed manufacturer had not stated on the plan that the cladding had a reference to the LHL testing.

When the customer advised the supplier, who in turn asked the building inspector to explain the problem, the building inspector advised the supplier to read the literature provided by the ASI’s shedsafe endorsement.  Interestingly, the booklet showed a reference to the LHL endorsement, but no reference to the safety of the entire structure.

Getting back to the manufacturer’s point of view, there is clear evidence that the only guarantee and endorsement of ShedSafe may offer is the customer will have no idea of the origin of the actual material used to manufacture the product or if the product has been tested.

Therefore if the structure is endorsed by an incompetent engineer who has compromised his or her ethical standards, nevertheless signs a FORM 15, there will be no recourse unless the company that has hired the engineer replaces the product. The replacement is usually conditional that the incident be kept confidential.

Besides this, as already pointed out, if one single LHL endorsement can be used as a blanket cover for an entire corporation regardless of the corporation’s many separate roll forming outlets with differing profiles, or whether the origin of the coil is Australian or Imported, how does the building inspector know the difference without authentic documentation? Does the material in question have a specific test certificate stating the origin of the material along with an endorsement from the testing facility given that what he is inspecting explicitly refers to the cladding and top span required on the approved plan, or does he really care about the weightier issues that he may be forced to confront?

Summary

The main reason of this viewpoint by two very different members of the shed industry supply chain is to generate discussion that will enable shed purchasers to be confident that all the factors & PROMISES made by the industry groups are capable of being produced in the supply & erection of their shed.

 To finalise, there is an instance of a well known shed supplier who sold (supply) only to a customer that collapsed during construction. This occurrence was exploited by others in the shed industry to their advantage by giving this as an example of a non-compliant shed industry member. Very far from the truth, the particular shed supplier warned the shed erector constantly regarding construction techniques – all advice was ignored. Subsequent investigations resulted in the shed manufacturer being involved – but of all the parties involved – the shed manufacturer supplied and erected the shed for no charge. This is the type of example of pride in this industry we need. The investigating bodies had no idea of what had occurred – only guesses.

Many thanks to the contributions of the rollformer and the shed manufacturer for this valuable insight into only two areas of the industry. Hopefully more to come from these two gurus of the industry!

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New shed at Wacol raises questions!

Posted on : January 25, 2012

Queensland steel industry feels the heat from cheap Chinese suppliers

This the heading from the Brisbane Times Article on January 23rd 2012. Basically a local Queensland company has won the contract to build the new Hitachi Headquarters at Wacol. The uproar is about the source of the steel, of which Southern Queensland Steel (next door to new building) failed to win the contract to supply the builder Spaceframe with the steel!

Here’s a picture of the new site for Hitachi and the Spaceframe building sign out the front.

 

Hitachi Machinery New Wacol Headquarters Site

 

 Here’s what Mr. Ian Cairns of the ASI stated in the article:

The Australian company that lost the contract, Southern Queensland Steel, confirmed the situation but directed questions to the Australian Steel Institute, of which it is a member.

The Australian Steel Institute blames Chinese government subsidies and the undervalued yuan for creating an unfair advantage for Chinese suppliers over local companies and increasing pressure on an industry that employs about 100,000 people nationwide. 

So what is the answer to this? Here are some of the questions raised by this deal between an Australian builder and the chinese steel supplier:

  1. Spaceframe is a Queensland company with many projects under its belt, both here in Australia and in Asia and the Pacific. It also has offices in China (see their website above) and is a very progressive company (family owned & run). Why is that Spaceframe can obtain prices from China for pre cut steel and yet the giants of the Australian Steel Suppliers are unable to do this?
  2. Southern Queensland Steel has both local and imported products – if builders want quotes on large quantities of precut steel – then they should be able to offer the same imported Chinese steel supply! BlueScope imports steel, One Steel imports steel, Orrcon imports steel along with just about all major steel manufacturers.
  3. Why is the ASI (a part of BlueScope) suddenly blaming the Chinese government for all this. Surely among some of the ASI’s vast membership – one would think the buying power from China would be greater than that of Spaceframe?

Ian cairns of the ASI went on regarding subsidies and the value of the Yuan versus the dollar!

‘‘We’ve got an undervalued currency from a major competitor, and of course we have a resources boom that is fuelling our currency as well, to the detriment of manufacturers,’’ he said.

‘‘So we’ve got a double whammy, where you could almost argue that the dollar is overpriced by 30 per cent and the yuan is underpriced by 30 per cent.’’

‘‘So before we even start [competing] we are 60 per cent off the mark.’’

But Ian, surely your members would be better off taking advantage of this to supply steel rather than pay more for Australian steel and not sell it? The members of the ASI could definately buy at a better rate from China than Spaceframe.

Also the engineering and design for many of these projects are now being sourced from overseas and having multiply specifications that allow steel to be supplied globally. When local builders can source direct from China and it’s hugh number of suppliers, why can’t the steel suppliers also do this. Much of the material used in manufacture of the local domestic shed industry is imported. Maybe the steel suppliers of Australia will have to open up offices in China to combat these cheaper prices.

 

 

 

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New Shed on the Block

Posted on : December 26, 2011

Tetra Shed – Modular Shed Building!

Australia has had its revolution in steel sheds – advantages and problems come with this style yet a new modular shed style is emerging in the UK, USA and Europe. The shed is called TETRA-SHED and has just won the 100% Design Award  in the UK and is currently under negotiations with an Australian Shed Manufacturer.

Tetra Shed is different and modular, capable of adding multiple sections as shown below:

The Large Scale Modular Tetra-Shed

 And another picture showing smaller modular grouping:

Tetra-Shed smaller groupings

But the big surprise is the quailty and appearence of the shed by itself:

Outside Tetra-Shed Single Module

 And the inside is spectacular:

Shed Stunning Interior!

 With the above photos, it is very obvious that this system is easily adapted to the Australian mining, educational and accomodation industries. All of the industries and manufacturing groups are represented here, with the cladding being substituted with sheet Corten Steel, Stainless or even old corrugated for the backyard number.

Current BCA & ASA compliance is under way and will be available in 2012!

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Strange Shed – Balancing Barn?

Posted on : September 9, 2011

The shed/barn house is 100 feet long and only 50 feet of the base is on solid ground? There’s even a window in the floor to look down to the grassy area below.

Balancing Barn - Would you feel safe?

This is a holiday home that you can rent that is a few miles inland from the Suffolk Coast in the UK.  Some renters of the property worry if too many people go to the end it will tip! Maybe only a few too many meat pies for lunch could tip the scales of balance. You can rent this  “The Balancing Barn” (www.living-architecture.co.uk) that sleeps up to eight people and costs from £638 for a four-night midweek stay. The house was designed, built and owned by the not for profit group Living Architecture – whose co-founder designed this, Mr. Alain de Botton. Very different Alain.

Heres another view of the amazing Balancing Barn:

Strange Shed? For Rent

 They say as soon as you enter and walk across the threshold of the balancing point – you feel strangely in danger of it tipping! The floor window above the swing would also add to this.

Don’t think our portal frame sheds could delve into this magnitude of architecture?
 

 

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Innovation Award Submission 1

Posted on : August 12, 2011

The first Innovation Submission is from Campbell Shed Products. The following is an excerpt from their website http://www.shedproducts.com/about-us.html in regard to the history of this company and it’s innovative founder Mr. Errol Campbell.

Campbell Shed Products Pty Ltd is a Grafton based, private sector, free enterprise business pioneered and managed by local Errol Campbell. It supplies the retail shed industry and hardware outlets of Australia with an expanding range of quality, innovative shed and garage products, components and accessories.

Campbell Shed Products has been successfully running for over 20 years. From humble beginnings as a pre engineered building fabricator and constructor to it’s own company having developed it’s own line of world first products during that time.

Errol has won various awards for his achievements and has created a new concept in the pre-fabricated building industry. In June 1999 Errol was rewarded for his accolades and won the Utility Section of the Inventor’s Fair held in conjunction with the international Philosophy, Science and Theology Festival.

In recent years, Campbell Shed Products has delved into the new market of accessories and components for the pre-engineered building industry. He has pioneered a range of products boasting to add additional perfection to a once thought basic shed. These include Vermaseal, FormGirt and are currently working on a full range of Retroseal products. They have grown from strength to strength and are now nation wide distributors from their Grafton factory.

Errol’s inquiring mind is said to be the motive behind the ideas. He felt he could significantly contribute to the growing industry. On receiving positive feedback on the new products, he pursued these concepts to be later left with a line of world first products.

Campbell Shed Products have also won government grants and as a result is a member of the prestigious ATS (Australian Technology Showcase).

 

Now to the product that Errol has chosen to represent Campbell Shed Products in the Shedeye Innovation Awards.

The below is the promotional detail on the “Superseal” which is a Multipurpose PVC vermin and weatherproof flashing that can be added to new or existing metal clad sheds, garages and homes with concrete floors. Not only is it easily installed – the multiple benefits it provides are numerous and quite unique.

"The Retroseal Superseal"

The features are numerous and include, snake & vermin proofing, maintains a drip free edge for the metal wall sheets, the internal skirt allows easy cleaning, very easy installation with a Tek screw though the sheet into the “Superseal”, UV protected, will not rust and also allows for up to 27mm of variation in the slab.

Here is a closer look at the detail (not to scale)

It must have been a difficult task for Errol to nominate this product over the others in the range. All of Campbell Shed Products could be successfully entered in these Awards.

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Shed of Sticks

Posted on : August 5, 2011

Murtoa’s Stick Shed

This shed is possibly the most interesting example of construction in Austrlia. This iconic shed in Victoria has recently been “renovated” for a cost of $1.2 million. There were lots of people against the renovation for space reasons and money that may have been better spent. But the end result is an eye opener as you can see from some of the photos below.

Murtoa Stick Shed 1

The shed is 260m long, 19m high with 2.5m sides. it is held up by 560 unmilled timber poles. It was built in 1941 for wheat storage. There were originally two built (the other was twice as big) and there were plans to build a third. The larger was demolished in the early 1970s. A similar stick shed was pulled down in Parkes, NSW. The Murtoa shed is the only one of its kind remaining in the southern hemisphere. (kindly copied from http://www.kitezh.com/texts/murtoa.html )

Murtoa Stick Shed 2
The Murtoa Stick Shed spans the length of five Olympic swimming pools and the roof is not fixed but held down by wire?

 

Murtoa Stick Shed 3

And if you’re planning a holiday in Victoria – heres the location for the Stick Shed.

Murtoa Map

Also lend you support to Leigh (details below) who needs all the help he can find. Would make a great ICON for “The Mens Shed Group” – maybe Julia’s husband should join in the support group.

Leigh Hammerton
PO 77 Murtoa 3390
Ph 03 53852422
Email:murtoan@bigpond.net.au

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Shed sizes from Shedeye Designs

Posted on : April 23, 2011

Shedeye now has over 1000 sheds that have been designed using Shedeye, something we are quite stoked with.  We are on target as we stated in our 100 shed milestone.

This has given us access to some interesting statistics, for example the average size of sheds that has been designed using Shedeye is :

 

Shed size averages

Width : 7.3 meters

Length : 10.4 meters

Height 2.8 meters

 

Biggest Shed size

Width : 20 meters

Length : 75 meters

Height : 2.6 meters


Smallest Shed size

Width : 2.0 meters

Length : 2.5 meters

Height : 2.4 meters


The most Popular colours

Roof : Pale Eucalypt (TM)

Walls : Classic Cream (TM)

(This may be distorted as these are the default colours of the shed designer.  Also the current version does not allow Zinc to be selected.)

All in all we are very happy indeed, we are miles above any of our expectations.  Please keep the feedback coming.

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Shedeye reaches 100 Shed and Garage Designs

Posted on : January 15, 2011

We are really happy with the progress that this site is making and we are getting some extremely positive feedback with some great constructive criticism.

We are well ahead of our expected usage of this site; in fact we are quite surprised that anyone can find it! There have been some great, quite unique designs that have come out of the site already.

You will find two crazy designs nestled away in the site, created without my knowledge from my twin 6 year old boys. They found the site based on my conversations and proceeded to create their own designs. I only found out when they proudly insisted that I come and see them! Goes to show that it is child’s play to design a shed and request a quote, literally, using Shedeye.

Check out Caleb and Harrisons designs here :

Calebs Crazy Shed Design

Harrisons Crazy Shed Design

We are hoping for 2000 designs by June this year, once this is achieved this will make us the largest online steel shed and garage design and image library in the world.

Shed used as an Office

Double Garage with tool and workspace

Standard Double Car Garage

Single Caravan Garage

Thanks for using the site.  If you think of anything that could make it easier or more useful please let me know.  Over the next 2 months there are some exciting new features being introduced.

Russ Condick

Shedeye Founder.

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